NAME THAT COUNTRY

In the small, colonial city of Trinidad, the austere (yet pleasing, I think) Iglesia Parroquial de la Santísima, or Church of the Holy Trinity, surveys the main city square, Plaza Mayor. The church’s humble Neoclassical façade belies an exultant Neo-Gothic alter inside. Trinidad was a wealthy center of the sugar trade in the 18th and 19th centuries and its cobbled streets are lined with faded, grand villas and public buildings from that era. A few miles outside the city, over 50 sugar plantations operated in Valle de los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills), powered by the labor of tens of thousands of slaves. Trinidad and Valle de los Ingenios are both UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

Plaza de la Catedral is one of many public squares in the capital’s old city. The square was a swamp until drained in the 16th century. In a city known for Spanish colonial architecture, the 18th-century Cathedral of the Virgin Mary of the Immaculate Conception is one of few examples of the local Baroque style. 

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

From the late 18th to the late 19th century, the Valle de los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills) was a center of sugar production in our mystery country. At the peak of the industry, over fifty cane sugar mills were in operation, with over 30,000 slaves working in the mills and the sugar cane plantations that surrounded them.

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

This is Baracoa Bay, with the flat top El Yunque mountain in the background.
Christopher Columbus landed at Baracoa in 1492 and in 1511 the settlement there became the first Spanish capital of our mystery country. Baracoa is on the eastern tip of the country’s north coast. Surrounded by mountains, it’s very remote and was accessible only by sea until a road was built through the mountains in the 1960s.
The nearby Alejandro de Humboldt National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 122

These little yellow pods are affectionately known as Coco Taxis because of their resemblance to coconuts. They compete for tourist business with classic American cars, which famously grace the island roads of our mystery country. Essentially, the Coco Taxi is a motorized rickshaw, with 3 wheels and room for a driver and two passengers. If you don’t mind squeezing, a Coco Taxi will get you where you’re going for less money than a “Yank Tank.”

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NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 94

In the capital city of our mystery country, the Malecon seawall and waterfront boulevard is a popular gathering place, especially for young lovers watching the sun drop into the Gulf of Mexico. The Malecon stretches for 5 miles around the heart of the city and is lined with elegant, dilapidated villas.

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