NAME THAT COUNTRY

In the small, colonial city of Trinidad, the austere (yet pleasing, I think) Iglesia Parroquial de la Santísima, or Church of the Holy Trinity, surveys the main city square, Plaza Mayor. The church’s humble Neoclassical façade belies an exultant Neo-Gothic alter inside. Trinidad was a wealthy center of the sugar trade in the 18th and 19th centuries and its cobbled streets are lined with faded, grand villas and public buildings from that era. A few miles outside the city, over 50 sugar plantations operated in Valle de los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills), powered by the labor of tens of thousands of slaves. Trinidad and Valle de los Ingenios are both UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

 

Can you name that country? 
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NAME THAT COUNTRY

From the late 18th to the late 19th century, the Valle de los Ingenios (Valley of the Sugar Mills) was a center of sugar production in our mystery country. At the peak of the industry, over fifty cane sugar mills were in operation, with over 30,000 slaves working in the mills and the sugar cane plantations that surrounded them.

 

Can you name that country? 
See below for answers.

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Valle de los Ingenios, Cuba

The UNESCO World Heritage Site Valle de los Ingenios, or Valley of the Sugar Mills, is a series of three valleys near the city of Trinidad de Cuba. The valleys were the center of sugar cane production from the late 18th century until the late 19th century. At the peak of the sugar cane industry in Cuba, there were more than fifty mills operating in the valleys, with over 30,000 slaves working in the mills and the surrounding plantations. Sugar production was an important industry for Cuba from the earliest settlement by the Spanish, who introduced the crop to the island in 1512. The island became the world’s foremost producer of sugar during the late 18th and 19th centuries.

Manaca Iznaga plantation - The 147-foot bell tower once called slaves in and out of the fields. Former slave quarters, barracones, are still used for housing.

Manaca Iznaga plantation – The 147-foot bell tower once called slaves in and out of the fields. Former slave quarters, barracones, are still used for housing.

from atop the Iznaga Tower

from atop the Iznaga Tower

from Iznaga Tower

from Iznaga Tower

5 Things to do in Trinidad de Cuba

1. Walk around the city center
Trinidad de Cuba was founded in the 16th century but it really took off in the 18th century when it became a highly productive center of sugar production. Neoclassical, Moorish and Baroque colonial buildings line the cobbled streets, ghosts of a gilded age. Some are perfectly restored, many more are faded and worn, but still beautiful. Trinidad claims to be the best preserved colonial city in Latin America. It could be true. Continue reading

NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 30


All the clues in this post refer to one Ya’lla Tours destination: Bahrain, Cuba, Egypt, Greece, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Oman, Turkey, or United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi and Dubai).

We’ll show you images of popular tourist sites in our mystery country, along with descriptions of those sites. Continue reading