NAME THAT COUNTRY

The fresco pictured above is from Akrotiri, a Minoan city that was buried in ash from one of the largest volcanic eruptions ever recorded. This site is known as the “Pompeii” of our mystery country. Unlike Pompeii, it seems the inhabitants of Akrotiri had time to evacuate, as no human remains have been found at the site.

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

Charming Nafplion has a reputation as one of the prettiest towns in our mystery country, and that’s saying a lot. It’s located on the Peloponnese, a large peninsula  to the southwest of the mainland. Nafplion is often a gateway stop for tours of the Peloponnese, which continue on to historical sites such as Mycenae, Epidaurus and Olympia.

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

In the shadow of sacred Mount Parnassus, Delphi was an important religious sanctuary and known as the center of the world by the ancient people of our mystery country.
For centuries, pilgrims, including civic and military leaders, came from near and far to consult the oracle here, where the wisdom of the sun god was channeled through priestesses known as Pythia. Today, the site is one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations.

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY

This is the Lions Gate at Mycenae on the Peloponnese peninsula. Mycenae was a major center of power and cultural influence in the eastern Mediterranean from about 1600-1100BCE. Mycenean civilization was the first advanced civilization on the mainland of our mystery country. In Homer’s Iliad, Mycenae was among the city states that fought in the Trojan War over the abduction of Helen, wife of the King of Sparta (Menelaus) , who was the brother of the King of Mycenae (Agamemnon).

 

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NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 127

In the central north of or mystery country, a collection of  monasteries perch 1,000 feet above the Plain of Thessaly at the top of titanic natural pillars. This is Meteora, first inhabited by Christian hermits seeking solitude and security in the 11th century.
These first settlers scaled the towers and lived in caves and cracks in the stone.
In the 13th century, groups of monks came to the area and began to build. Over the next several hundred years over 20 monasteries were built. Today, six of the surviving monasteries are open to visitors.

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NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 117

With its elegant design and amazing acoustics, the theater at Epidaurus is widely considered to be the pinnacle of ancient performance venues. The theater was built as a compliment to the nearby Asclepeion health center. Asclepius, the god of medicine and healing, was born at Epidaurus, and his sanctuary there drew health-seekers from around the known world for almost a millennium, from the 6th-century BCE to the 5th-century CE, well into the Christian era. Dramatic performance was considered therapeutic and Asclepeion patients were often prescribed an evening at the theater.
The theater is still in regular use, especially during the annual, summer Epidaurus Festival.

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NAME THAT COUNTRY Episode 108

On the island of Milos, Kleftiko, also known as “Meteora of the Sea,” is a popular excursion for swimming, snorkeling, diving and kayaking. Shapely gray-white rock formations make a striking contrast to the clear turquoise water and harbor caves and little coves for exploring. Kleftiko is in a remote part of the island and predominantly reached by sea, although there is a hiking trail. Group tour boats and private yachts depart regularly from Adamas and Pollonia.

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