Gates of Fez

Founded in the 8th century, Fez is the intellectual, cultural and spiritual center of Morocco. The Medina, or Old City, is one of the best preserved medieval cities anywhere. Today, the pungent, labyrinthine Medina pulses with daily life much as it has for over 1,000 years. The Medina consists of the larger and older Fes el Bali, parts of which date to the 9th century, and Fes Jdid, which originated in the 13th century. Fes el Bali is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Some of the most interesting sites in the Medina are the many gates that pierce the ancient city walls. Here are just a few:

Bab Bou Jeloud

Bab Bou Jeloud

Bab Bou Jeloud – the main gateway to the Medina on the north, built in 1913

Fez Royal Palace

Fez Royal Palace

Bab Makhzen – a slight departure from our current theme, this is not a gate in the city walls but rather the northern gate of the Royal Palace (Dar Makhzen). The gate is a modern addition, built in 1960 over the original gate. The palace is not open to the public, but this gate is one of the city’s most photographed sites. Although sometimes called the Golden Gates, the doors are made of bronze.

Royal Palace side entrance

Royal Palace side entrance

Royal Palace side entrance – another entrance to the Royal Palace, far less flashy than the Golden Gates, but lovely all the same

Bab Semmarine

Bab Semmarine

Bab Semmarine – a main entrance to Fes Jdid, originally the city’s main food storage site

Bab Riafa

Bab Riafa

Bab Riafa – a main entrance into the Medina for motorized traffi

Bab Chorfa

Bab Chorfa

Bab Chorfa – northwest entrance to the Medina at the Kasbah Nouar, 11th century

Bab Al Amer

Bab Al Amer

Bab Al Amer – 13th century entrance to Fes Jdid, adjacent to the Mellah (Jewish district)

Bab Dkaken

Bab Dkaken

Bab Dkaken – 13th century gate to Fes Jdid

Bab Rcif

Bab Rcif

Bab Rcif – a 20th century entrance to Fes el Bali and the lovely square Place Rcif

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